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Shakespeare's Tragedies By Alexander Leggatt (University of Toronto)

Shakespeare's Tragedies

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Shakespeare's Tragedies: Violation and Identity traces the linked themes of violation and identity through seven Shakespearean tragedies. Written in a clear, accessible style, it will appeal not just to specialists but to students and general readers with an interest in Shakespeare.
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Shakespeare's Tragedies Summary


Shakespeare's Tragedies: Violation and Identity by Alexander Leggatt (University of Toronto)

Shakespeare's Tragedies: Violation and Identity traces the linked themes of violation and identity through seven Shakespearean tragedies, beginning with the rape of Lavinia in Titus Andronicus. The implications of this event - its physical and moral shock, the way it puts Lavinia's identity, and the whole notion of identity, into crisis - reverberate through Shakespeare's later tragedies. Through close, theatrically informed readings of Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, King Lear and Macbeth the book traces the way acts of violence provoke questions about the identities of the victims, the perpetrators, and the acts themselves. It shows that violation can be involved in the most innocent-looking acts, that words can be weapons, that interpretation itself can be a form of damage. Written in a clear, accessible style, this study provokes questions about the human implications of Shakespearean tragedy.

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Shakespeare's Tragedies Reviews


'Leggatt proves himself a remarkably sensitive and subtle guide, providing engaging, even surprising comments which provoke the reader to think more carefully about Shakespeare's plays. ... this is a fine book of straightforward criticism. For its clarity alone, it is invaluable to anyone interested in Shakespeare: undergraduates will find it endlessly informative (and what's more, they'll understand it), while established scholars will also discover significant gems.' New Theatre Quarterly
'A deeply imaginative book ... By the time we come to the end of the book we realize how inexhaustibly fruitful his cumulative method is.' Shakespeare Survey 59
"Leggatt has produced an intriguing, beautifully-written book that traces a number of fascinating patterns throughout many, not all, of Shakespeare's tragedies." Linda Anderson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Renaissance Quarterly
"Throughout the book, Leggatt consistently does Shakespeare's text the honor of close reading and careful attention to the staging. As with the tragedies themselves, there can be no easy closure to the difficult themes raised by the book. Which is as it should be." - Anthony Low, New York University Emeritus

About Alexander Leggatt (University of Toronto)


Alexander Leggatt is Professor of English at University College, University of Toronto.

Table of Contents


Introduction; 1. Titus Andronicus: This was thy daughter; 2. Romeo and Juliet: what's in a name? 3. Hamlet: a figure like your father; 4. Troilus and Cressida: this is and is not Cressid; 5. Othello: I took you for that cunning whore of Venice; 6. King Lear: we have no such daughter; 7. Macbeth: a deed without a name; Conclusion.

Additional information

GOR003749701
Shakespeare's Tragedies: Violation and Identity by Alexander Leggatt (University of Toronto)
Alexander Leggatt (University of Toronto)
Used - Very Good
Paperback
Cambridge University Press
2005-05-12
240
0521608635
9780521608633
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us.