Free Shipping In Australia
Currency:
AUD $ AUD
The Records of the Nation By Edited by G.H. Martin

The Records of the Nation
by Edited by G.H. Martin

In Stock
$15.99
+10% GST
In this collection, 15 essays deal with the history and development of the Public Record Office and with access to records by way of calendars and indexes. Two papers put forward the interests of those who use records and six are concerned with matters relating to probate records.
Only 1 left

The Records of the Nation Summary


The Records of the Nation: Public Record Office, 1838-1988 - British Record Society, 1880-1988 by Edited by G.H. Martin

In 1838 the Public Records Act brought the public records, then scattered through London in a vast number of different repositories, under a single administration, and over the following decades a new centralised building, a Public Records Office, for keeping them was erected in Chancery Lane. Exactly 50 years later the Index Library of the British Record Society was created to publish indexes to the public records. Over the following century much has changed and in 1988 the Public Record Office and the British Record Society joined to hold a celebratory conference. This volume publishes some of the papers read on that occasion. The fifteen papers on the public records are concerned, firstly, with the history and development of the Public Records Office, and, secondly, with access to records by way of calenders and indexes. These are followed by two papers representing the interests of consumers of public records. The six papers on probate records offer some new approaches to wills, inventories and probate accounts and should be of particular interest to those working in early modern English history.

Why buy from World of Books

Our excellent value books literally don't cost the earth
Free delivery in Australia
Read more here
Every used book bought is one saved from landfill

Table of Contents


Part 1 The history and development of the public record office: the international role of the public record office, Michael Roper; the public records in 1988, Geoffrey Martin; nine centuries of keeping the public records, Elizabeth M. Hallam; the future of the public records, Geoffrey Martin; the selection of new records, K.J. Smith; government record keeping - a tale from the department of employment, R.J.R. Lorrimer; preservation and conservation - will our public records survive another 150 years?, Timothy R. Padfield; the thirty year rule and freedom of information - access to government records, Nicholas Cox. Part 2 Calenders and indexes: public record office publication - past performances and future prospects, J.B. Post; the public record office, the historian, and information technology, Edward Higgs; the national register of archives and other nationwide finding aids, Brian S. Smith; the index library - a centenary history 1988, Peter Spufford; liaison - public records held in other record offices, Alexandra Nicol. Part 3 Contrasting consumers: a genealogist's view of the records - ideals and reality, Stella Colwell; the use of records in primary schools; bibliography, Joan Blyth. Part 4 The probate records of the nation - new approaches to wills, inventories and accounts: a printed catalogue of the names of testators, Peter Spufford; the number of wills proved in the 16th and 17th centuries, Motoyasu Takahashi; in the name of God? Will-making and faith in early modern England, Christopher W. Marsh; probate inventories and consumer behaviour in England, 1660-1740, Lorna Weatherill; an introduction to probate accounts, Amy Louise Erickson; the genealogist's use of probate records, Anthony J. Camp.

Additional information

GOR010100542
The Records of the Nation: Public Record Office, 1838-1988 - British Record Society, 1880-1988 by Edited by G.H. Martin
Edited by G.H. Martin
Used - Well Read
Hardback
Boydell & Brewer Ltd
1990-09-30
320
0851155383
9780851155388
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us.