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Banana Cultures By John Soluri

Banana Cultures by John Soluri

Condition - Very Good
$52.99
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Summary

Integrates agro-ecology, anthropology, political economy, and history to trace the symbiotic growth of the export banana industry in Honduras and the consumer mass market in the United States. This title examines the tensions between the small-scale growers, who dominated the trade in the early years, and the shippers.

Banana Cultures Summary

Banana Cultures: Agriculture, Consumption, and Environmental Change in Honduras and the United States by John Soluri

Winner, George Perkins Marsh Award for Best Book in Environmental History, American Society for Environmental History, 2007 Bananas, the most frequently consumed fresh fruit in the United States, have been linked to Miss Chiquita and Carmen Miranda, "banana republics," and Banana Republic clothing stores-everything from exotic kitsch, to Third World dictatorships, to middle-class fashion. But how did the rise in banana consumption in the United States affect the banana-growing regions of Central America? In this lively, interdisciplinary study, John Soluri integrates agroecology, anthropology, political economy, and history to trace the symbiotic growth of the export banana industry in Honduras and the consumer mass market in the United States. Beginning in the 1870s when bananas first appeared in the U.S. marketplace, Soluri examines the tensions between the small-scale growers, who dominated the trade in the early years, and the shippers. He then shows how rising demand led to changes in production that resulted in the formation of major agribusinesses, spawned international migrations, and transformed great swaths of the Honduran environment into monocultures susceptible to plant disease epidemics that in turn changed Central American livelihoods. Soluri also looks at labor practices and workers' lives, changing gender roles on the banana plantations, the effects of pesticides on the Honduran environment and people, and the mass marketing of bananas to consumers in the United States. His multifaceted account of a century of banana production and consumption adds an important chapter to the history of Honduras, as well as to the larger history of globalization and its effects on rural peoples, local economies, and biodiversity.

Banana Cultures Reviews

"This is an elegant book, well suited for classroom use, that weaves together environmental, labour and consumer histories...Soluri deftly shows that our national blinders and existing typologies have obscured as much as they have revealed. This excellent book deserves a wide readership."-Cindy Forster, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Vol. 28, No. 2, April 2009

About John Soluri

John Soluri is Associate Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

Table of Contents

Preface Acknowledgments Introduction. Linking Places of Production and Consumption Chapter 1. Going Bananas Chapter 2. Space Invaders Chapter 3. Altered Landscapes and Transformed Livelihoods Chapter 4. Sigatoka, Science, and Control Chapter 5. Revisiting the Green Prison Chapter 6. The Lives and Time of Miss Chiquita Chapter 7. La Quimica Chapter 8. Bananas Cultures in Comparative Perspective Notes Bibliography Index

Additional information

GOR010970045
9780292712560
0292712561
Banana Cultures: Agriculture, Consumption, and Environmental Change in Honduras and the United States by John Soluri
Used - Very Good
Paperback
University of Texas Press
2006-01-02
336
Winner of George Perkins Marsh Award for Best Book in Environmental History, American Society for Environmental History 2007 (United States)
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us

Customer Reviews - Banana Cultures