Free Shipping in Australia on over 5 million books in stock
We Ain't What We Ought to be By Stephen Tuck

We Ain't What We Ought to be

In Stock
$42.99
inc. GST
Traces the black freedom struggle from the first years of freedom during the Civil War to President Obama's inauguration. This title explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders.
Only 1 left

We Ain't What We Ought to be Summary


We Ain't What We Ought to be: The Black Freedom Struggle from Emancipation to Obama by Stephen Tuck

In this exciting revisionist history, Stephen Tuck traces the black freedom struggle in all its diversity, from the first years of freedom during the Civil War to President Obama's inauguration. As it moves from popular culture to high politics, from the Deep South to New England, the West Coast, and abroad, Tuck weaves gripping stories of ordinary black people - as well as celebrated figures - into the sweep of racial protest and social change. The drama unfolds from an armed march of longshoremen in post - Civil War Baltimore to Booker T. Washington's founding of Tuskegee Institute; from the race riots following Jack Johnson's 'fight of the century' to Rosa Parks' refusal to move to the back of a Montgomery bus; and, from the rise of hip hop to the journey of a black Louisiana grandmother to plead with the Tokyo directors of a multinational company to stop the dumping of toxic waste near her home. "We Ain't What We Ought To Be" rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle. Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders. As Tuck shows, strategies were ultimately contingent on the power of activists to protest amidst shifting economic and political circumstances in the U.S. and abroad. This book captures an extraordinary journey that speaks to all Americans - both past and future.

Why buy from World of Books

Our excellent value books literally don't cost the earth
Free delivery in Australia
Read more here
Every used book bought is one saved from landfill

We Ain't What We Ought to be Reviews


In this sweeping and absorbing history of black activism, Tuck highlights the achievements of community organizing from the mid-19th century to Barack Obama's dexterous grassroots campaign for the presidency. Tuck argues that there is no one black protest movement or agenda and casts his net over 150 years of black political engagement to reel in untold stories and unsung heroes. He is particularly attentive to the first 20 years of the 20th century, which saw protest, empowerment, and the rise of galvanizing figures from Marcus Garvey to boxer Jack Johnson. While the civil rights movement of the 1960s has become emblematic in the chronology of black history, according to Tuck, it does not define the ongoing fight for social justice and freedom among blacks in America. With rich detail and a strong narrative, Tuck fills in gaps in the story, from the lesser known backroom dealings of Booker T. Washington to the noble efforts on behalf of black women by Anna Julia Cooper. Publishers Weekly 20091123 A multitude of black experiences have contributed to the complexity and diversity of the civil rights struggle beyond the iconic portrayals of the movement. Historian Tuck juxtaposes local versus national, southern versus northern, violent versus nonviolent, wartime versus peacetime, secular versus religious, separatist versus integrationist, and other polarities. Tuck profiles famous and obscure African Americans who have struggled for human and civil rights since slavery. Along with Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, and others, he profiles Robert Smalls, an enslaved assistant to a captain in the Confederate navy, who sailed the ship to freedom while the white crew and captain slept, and Fanny Peck, a black Detroit housewife who launched a boycott in 1930 of businesses that didn't hire blacks. He chronicles struggles of black feminists, gays and lesbians, environmentalists, and others who don't often make the pages of the history books. In this well-researched volume, Tuck details protests large and small, individual and organized, from Emancipation to the election of Barack Obama. -- Vanessa Bush Booklist 20091215 Oxford University lecturer Stephen Tuck's We Ain't What We Ought To Be is a collection of voices that document our struggle for equality in America from the Reconstruction era until now. It's all here--the great speeches and moments--but it's the nod to the common woman and man that lifts this narrative a notch above similar titles. -- Patrik Henry Bass Essence 20100201 We Ain't What We Ought To Be is an astounding exercise in synthesis, bringing together the past decade of research on the African-American experience. To scholars of southern and black history, what Tuck calls "revelations" will be anything but. However, most Americans are still under the spell of the genre's first generation, with its neat divisions between North and South, violent and nonviolent, and civil rights and Black Power. Tuck's book could change that. -- Clay Risen Bookforum 20100201

About Stephen Tuck


Stephen Tuck is University Lecturer in American History, Pembroke College, Oxford University.

Additional information

GOR005755627
We Ain't What We Ought to be: The Black Freedom Struggle from Emancipation to Obama by Stephen Tuck
Stephen Tuck
Used - Very Good
Hardback
Harvard University Press
2010-01-22
528
0674036263
9780674036260
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us.