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The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece By Sviatoslav Dmitriev (Associate Professor of History, Ball State University)

The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece
by Sviatoslav Dmitriev (Associate Professor of History, Ball State University)

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This book elucidates the many uses of the slogan of freedom by ancient Greeks, beginning with the Peloponnesian war and continuing throughout the Hellenistic period, and shows in detail how the Romans appropriated and adjusted Greek political vocabulary and practices to establish the pax Romana over the Mediterranean world.
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The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece Summary


The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece by Sviatoslav Dmitriev (Associate Professor of History, Ball State University)

The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece elucidates the main steps and ways in which the slogan of freedom emerged and developed into the fundamental principle of Greek diplomacy and politics, long before the Romans appropriated and used this slogan to establish their domination over the Mediterranean. Originally employed by the Spartans and Athenians, who used it to subvert each other's military alliances before and during the Peloponnesian war, the slogan of freedom helped to maintain political and military balance among the major Greek powers during the classical period, putting a check on their aspirations. After Philip II and Alexander III (the Great) established Macedonian rule over Greece, and in the subsequent Hellenistic period, the slogan of freedom not only continued to be an important tool for undermining rival military alliances and vindicating aggressions on behalf of those whose freedom was allegedly violated or endangered, but also served to determine the status of individual Greek communities. Once Rome became involved in Greek affairs, she made the slogan of freedom part of her policy in Greece. The Romans' claim of protecting Greek freedom was their only justification for interfering in Greek affairs. Individual Greek cities preserved their status, including freedom, by pledging loyalty and good faith to Rome. This network of mutual obligations and responsibilities evolved into a system of political control over the Greeks, which came to be known as the Roman Peace (pax Romana). This book argues, therefore, that the Roman Mediterranean empire was built not only on military might, but also on diplomacy, including a skillful Roman adaptation to local political practices and vocabulary.

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The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece Reviews


Dmitriev's study is a well-produced and often persuasive addition to the scholarship on the Roman conquest of Greece. * Dylan Bloy, Bryn Mawr Classical Review *

About Sviatoslav Dmitriev (Associate Professor of History, Ball State University)


Sviatoslav Dmitriev is Associate Professor of History, Ball State University

Table of Contents


Abbreviations Introduction PART ONE. The Slogan of Freedom from the Peloponnesian War to the Coming of Rome Chapter 1. From the Peloponnesian War to the Enthronement of Philip II of Macedonia Chapter 2. The Macedonian Peace of Philip II and Alexander the Great Chapter 3. The Slogan of Freedom Under and After the Successors PART TWO. Early Roman Politics in Greece Chapter 4. Rome and the Greeks from 229 to the Declaration of Flamininus Chapter 5. The Origin of the Roman slogan of Greek Freedom Chapter 6. The Roman Slogan of Greek Freedom Against Nabis and Antiochos III PART THREE. The Aftermath: from the Defeat of Antiochos III to the Destruction of Corinth Chapter 7. Rome and Greek Cities Chapter 8. Rhodes between Rome and Perseus Chapter 9. The Downfall of the Achaean League and Polybios's History Epilogue: The Slogan of Freedom from the King's Peace to the pax Romana Appendix 1. The End of the Theban Affiliation with the Second Athenian Confederacy Appendix 2. Sparta's Alleged Participation in the Athens Peace Appendix 3. The "Peace of 367" (the Peace of Pelopidas) and Diodoros Appendix 4. The Content of the King's Peace and the "Territorial Clause" Appendix 5. Philip's Leadership of the Thessalians Appendix 6. Demosthenes's Macedonian Diplomacy in the Reign of Alexander Appendix 7. Alexander's Treatment of Individual Greek Cities of Asia Minor Appendix 8. The Expeditions of Heracleides and Dicaearchos Appendix 9. Fides and (Roman and Foreign) clientelae Select Bibliography Index of Inscriptions, Papyri, and Coins Index of Ancient Authors and Texts Index of Names and Subjects

Additional information

GOR009694608
The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece by Sviatoslav Dmitriev (Associate Professor of History, Ball State University)
Sviatoslav Dmitriev (Associate Professor of History, Ball State University)
Used - Very Good
Hardback
Oxford University Press Inc
2011-03-11
544
0195375181
9780195375183
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us.